Women weave, spun and combed flax. Miniature from the giovani boccaccioilluminated manuscripts of the treatise by Giovanni Boccaccio “about famous women.”

Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. France, XV century

 

 

 

 

A Muzhik Botching the Bast Shoes, an Old Woman Spinning Threadspinning
Oil on canvas. 53 х 70,5

Date first half of XIX century

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raspal, Antoine – The Couturiers workshop – 1760raspal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tunictunics egypt

Place of origin:
Akhmim, Egypt (possibly, made)

Date:
600-800 (made)

Artist/Maker:
unknown (production)

Materials and Techniques:
Woven linen, with tapestry-woven woollen decoration

Tunics were the principal garments found in the burial grounds of Egypt, which were situated beyond the flood plains of the Nile, the hot dry sand ensuring the long survival of textiles and other objects. Excavations of these graves in the later 19th and early 20th centuries revealed numerous precious and household goods as well as vast numbers of clothing and textiles. After the practise of mummification ceased, it became common to bury the dead with their clothes and other goods.

Tunics were the basic costume worn by both men and women, knee length or longer for men and always long for women. They were normally woven in one piece, which would take the form of a cross if spread out. The shoulder bands, derived from the Roman clavus (the Latin for stripe), originally identified the status of the wearer, but subsequently the ornaments on tunics, as in this case, became purely decorative ,3

V & A MUSEUM

Blouse blouse

Place of origin:
Murcia, Spain (probably, made)

Date:
1700-1800 (made)

Artist/Maker:
unknown (production)

Materials and Techniques:
Linen, embroidered with silk and with linen insertions

The skill and attention to detail with which this small child’s blouse was made is still evident and astonishing, despite the fact that the linen cloth has discoloured with age. The garment’s maker used ample amounts of linen for the body and sleeves, ensuring comfort and freedom of movement. The material is gathered tightly at the neck and wrists and secured with lines of decorative stitching in black silk. Gussets under the arms would have allowed the child even greater movement.

Instead of using simple seams, the sleeves and gussets have been attached with embroidered insertions worked in linen thread. The insertions imitate lace and are a light and delicate complement to the volume of fabric falling from the neck. A similar effect has been achieved along the top of the shoulder by pulling together threads from the linen ground and securing them with white and light brown silk ♥~

V & A MUSEUM

Doublet  silver waveing

Place of origin:
Britain, United Kingdom (made)
Italy (woven)

Date:
1650-1665 (made)

Artist/Maker:
unknown (production)

Materials and Techniques:
Silver-gilt silk tissue, trimmed with silver-gilt bobbin lace, lined with silk taffeta and reinforced with linen, hand-sewn with silk and linen thread

Credit Line:
Purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Friends of the V&A, and a number of private donors

Doublets formed part of the fashionable ensemble of clothing worn by men in Europe until the late 1660s. The very short length of this example is characteristic of the extreme style of doublets at their final appearance in the male wardrobe. From 1650 to 1665, doublets shortened so that there was a gap between doublet and breeches through which the shirt could be seen. The centre back and front sleeves were left unstitched for further exposure of the shirt, which in the 17th century was considered underwear. More conservative members of society considered the result rather untidy looking. Such a radical fashion, usually worn by young men, attracted the attention of cartoonists and the condemnation of moralists.

The spectacular golden effect of the fabric of this example was created by weaving with silk and with threads wrapped with strips of silver gilt. This splendid material was probably imported from Italy, as there was little in the way of silk-weaving in Britain at this time. Adding to the luxurious effect is the lavish use of bobbin lace also made of silver-gilt thread

The Three Crowns Banner (Kölner Stadt Banner) in the workshop of Schnutgen Museum for the exhibition “-size of the Middle Ages – Cologne masterpieces from the major collections in the world” , 4th November 2011-26. February 2012 prepared. Loose, loose textile fibers and the application of paint to be preserved and strengthened
Date after 1450

Medium silk ♥~3 q banner

Sandalssandale egipat
Period: New Kingdom
Dynasty: Dynasty 18
Reign: reign of Thutmose III
Date: ca. 1479–1425 B.C.
Geography: Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Wadi Gabbanat el-Qurud, Tomb of the 3 Foreign Wives of Thutmose III, Wadi D, Tomb 1 Medium: Gold

MET MUSEUM ♥~

3 panels

3 panels of an old silk endek selendang from Buleleng. Collected by Balique Arts of Indonesia.

Early 20th cent

Indegneus women in Ande

Woman’s Mantle (Lliclla), colonial period (late 16th–early 17th century)
Central Andean
Tapestry-woven (weft-patterned) camelid wool

Acquired in 1908 for the Museum’s textile department, this tapestry mantle was long thought to be from nineteenth-century Mexico; in 1942, it was recognized as a remarkably early example of colonial-era weaving from Peru. Despite the European-style patterning, the presence of badgelike Precolumbian motifs called tocapu in the bands delineating the separate fields helps to date it to the sixteenth or seventeenth century

MET MUSEUM

Jeune fille arabe ~ Tlemcen

Jeune fille arabe ~ Tlemcen

pillow

Pillow cover
Skyros, possibly early 19th century

Linen embroidered with silk in satin and chain stitch
The central figure is dressed in traditional Ottoman manner with trousers, a kaftan and a large turban

spinning thread

spinning thread

textile fragment  Textile fragment
Period: Sasanian
Date: ca. 6th–7th century A.D.
Geography: Iran
Culture: Sasanian
Medium: Cotton, plain weave, undyed

MET MUSEUM

The Search After Truthtrapesty

Object:
Tapestry panel

Place of origin:
Germany (made)

Date:
ca. 1490 (made)

Artist/Maker:
unknown (production)

Materials and Techniques:
Tapestry-woven wool and linen on linen warp, silk, embroidered

This panel, the V&A’s first tapestry purchase, depicts a woman’s allegorical search for Truth. The tapestry is by an unknown designer and weaver, and is presumed to have been woven in a convent in the area of the Middle Rhine.

It tells of a woman’s search for enlightenment and her rejection of earthly, for sacred, love. In this hanging, she resolves to confess her sins, after which she washes her heart in blood to purify it, receives the sacrament of Holy Communion, and, finally, enters a convent. Decorative bands of script relate the story.

 

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